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  #11  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:16 AM
figaro figaro is offline
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I don't have my Professor Beery books in front of me - I actually let a friend borrow them. But I remember him using some form of the running w to lay the horse down on the ground - I remember him explaining that this should be done in a soft area to prevent injury to the horse. Once on the ground the trainer would walk and sit on the horse - this was a way of showing dominance over the animal and part of the suggested breaking process. Running w's may be called something else by other discplines too which may be one reason there's not a lot of information about them on the internet. As you know lots of saddlebred folks refer to them as "ropes." This is an interesting topic though - wonder who did invent them?
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  #12  
Old 04-10-2012, 08:26 AM
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SmartAlex SmartAlex is offline
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Originally Posted by figaro View Post
I don't have my Professor Beery books in front of me - I actually let a friend borrow them. But I remember him using some form of the running w to lay the horse down on the ground - I remember him explaining that this should be done in a soft area to prevent injury to the horse. Once on the ground the trainer would walk and sit on the horse - this was a way of showing dominance over the animal and part of the suggested breaking process.
I worked for a local horse trainer (of all types) who would do this as a last resort for driving horses. But we didn't use Ws. Just a pulley rein in harness, and maybe one leg cuff if necessary. Then he would sit on the horse's shoulder, look him in the eye, and talk to him for awhile.

Then, when it went back to the owner, it would usually revert to whatever naughtiness. We even had to make a house call once and repeat the process.


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Running w's may be called something else by other discplines too which may be one reason there's not a lot of information about them on the internet.
Could be, but if so, I've never come across it, and I've read A Lot cross discipline including drafts. I don't always remember where I read it anymore.
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  #13  
Old 04-10-2012, 02:57 PM
D_BaldStockings D_BaldStockings is offline
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This is one of the earliest references I have found to Running W.

Book was originally written circa 1750, and has been translated in to modern language...and had several possible updates, so not certain if the Running w is from the original, but
Horse Hoeing Husbandry - Jethro Tull

http://books.google.com/books?id=LoS...%20w%22&f=true

You can read the entire book, as it is one of many 'full view' books available on google.
Horse and cattle training begins page 540.

As a side note to my research, the running w appears to be more utilized as an 'emergency brake' and particularly in training driving horses that bolt in the 1800's - most horses were trained to both ride and drive as needed.

When horses were replaced with automobiles, the tool fell out of common use until the cinema revived it in exciting movie horse falls. This was outlawed in 1940.

About 1970, there was a resurgence of interest in and use of the running w as a training tool in the western disciplines that spread to others.
Some consider it mainstream, others damaging.
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  #14  
Old 04-10-2012, 03:25 PM
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When horses were replaced with automobiles, the tool fell out of common use until the cinema revived it in exciting movie horse falls. This was outlawed in 1940.
There is so much conflicting info about horses injured in the movies. Take for instance, the Ben-Hur Chariot race. If you read enough, you find several references who claim that in th 1920s version, a 100 or more horses were killed, and several references who claim it was the 1959 version where the horses were killed, but that none were killed in the silent film.

I know I read an interview which stated that Glenn Randall Sr trained those chariot horses to fall on cue and that now horses were injured in that spectacular scene. Of course, that was the second shooting. The first attempt in Italy was such a disaster that it was moved to California and reshot.

It's all dizzying. But yes, the Humane Society had horse tripping outlawed in 1940 because of the history of abuse and death (both accidental and not ) in stunt horses.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:53 PM
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mskyar mskyar is offline
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As you know lots of saddlebred folks refer to them as "ropes." This is an interesting topic though - wonder who did invent them?
My ex always called them Shackles.....And I have heard people refer to a horse as "shackley going".....(don't know if that is how you spell it or not!)
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Old 04-11-2012, 07:09 AM
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I would agree that "shackles" is the accepted vernacular, and certainly more common than "running W". If you shop for the boots, they are always called shackle boots. However, I've also heard the term "shackles" applied to "stretchies" (also known as "trips") and also to elastics run from the boots or cuffs to a point at the girth or saddle dees more common with TWHs.
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