Reminder: Opinions expressed in the discussion forum do not necessarily reflect those of the owner or moderators.


Go Back   Trot.org Forums > Retired Topics > General Forums > General Equine Topics - Forum Closed

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-17-2011, 07:51 PM
NBChoice
 
Posts: n/a
Maintaining arena footing.

Our indoor is 60x100 and has wood chips on top of a lime stone base.
We have 4 horses that get worked in it.

What is the best way to maintain it? How often do you water? What is the best way to spread it? Keep it from piling up in some places, and getting really thin in others, etc?
Any type of info would be great. We're trying to keep the footing good as long as possible!
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-17-2011, 08:35 PM
ASB Stars's Avatar
ASB Stars ASB Stars is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,098
You need to rake it off of the walls, and use a nice chain harrow, daily, imho, to keep it in top shape. Water as necessary for dust- and that means daily, in some circumstances.
__________________
"When someone shows you who they are- BELIEVE them" Maya Angelou

Yes, that IS a windmill I am tilting at!

www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net

http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/
  #3  
Old 06-17-2011, 10:17 PM
NBChoice
 
Posts: n/a
We have a chain harrow and sometimes find that it collects chips and just drags them along, not really spreading them out evenly.
  #4  
Old 06-18-2011, 07:18 AM
Breezy Breezy is offline
Member
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 56
wood chips are tough. I use a piece of wire fencing with a 2x6 attached to the front it moves a few chips but mostly slides over the top and smooth the footing out. If these are the chips from the tree trimmers becareful not to soak them and work quickly after as I they can get slick for a while,as I will soak mine at the end of the day.When I would add xtra to my arena I would use the manure spreader then rake high spots after. arenas can be like gardens always needing tending too. My favorite footing is still fine green cut sawdust, so easy to maintain the upfront cost is more their easy to maintain.
  #5  
Old 06-18-2011, 07:40 AM
ASB Stars's Avatar
ASB Stars ASB Stars is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,098
If the *teeth* in the drag are gathering your chips, you can flip the drag over, and use the less aggressive side, and see if that will at least spread them more uniformly.
__________________
"When someone shows you who they are- BELIEVE them" Maya Angelou

Yes, that IS a windmill I am tilting at!

www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net

http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/
  #6  
Old 06-18-2011, 09:45 AM
Samigator's Avatar
Samigator Samigator is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: St. Paul, MN
Posts: 1,290
the arena at the stable where my horse is uses woodchips. Of course I doubt there's a good base underneath it, which makes a big difference. They can make a nice footing, but they are also really high maintenance and rather dangerous. Granted, this arena gets more traffic in a day, but I find that the woodchips break down, then because you have to water them, they start decomposing with the horse poop, then they get slimy and really slippery. You almost have to drag it multiple times a day as if one person's horse slips or turns quickly, which happens frequently, it leaves a huge hole in the footing. I personally don't think I would use woodchips as footing for an arena if I were building one, they're way too slippery and I feel nervous just cantering my horse in it, for fear he's going to slip and fall (which does happen, I've seen lots of falls because of the slippery footing). I've seen some arenas where woodchips are successfully used, just not this one.

For maintenance, watering and dragging, along with pulling the shavings in from the walls. You tend to see a "track" or a groove in the footing around the outside of the arena where it gets most traveled. Every few years you need to add more chips as they old ones break down from compression, age, and decomposition.
__________________
Saddlebred In The Making
  #7  
Old 06-18-2011, 11:00 AM
ASB Stars's Avatar
ASB Stars ASB Stars is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,098
When I had an indoor, we had green sawdust, and sand, mixed about 50/50 in the ring. As stated, the wood does break down, and get rather slick, or dusty, as time goes on. Consequently, we pulled dead footing out, and replaced it, annually.

If you haven't got good footing, you've got nothing. You can't do the work you need to.

My outdoor is sand and rubber, and I love it. Unless there is snow on it, it is usable year round. I do drag it regularly.
__________________
"When someone shows you who they are- BELIEVE them" Maya Angelou

Yes, that IS a windmill I am tilting at!

www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net

http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/
  #8  
Old 06-18-2011, 02:25 PM
Silly Filly Silly Filly is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 1,183
Quote:
Originally Posted by NBChoice View Post
We have a chain harrow and sometimes find that it collects chips and just drags them along, not really spreading them out evenly.
We attached a board to our drag and drilled bolts through it. It was enough to weight the drag down, and the bolts dig into the footing to make it drag better.
  #9  
Old 06-18-2011, 08:35 PM
ASB Stars's Avatar
ASB Stars ASB Stars is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,098
I've got a 6" by 6" on top of mine. However, the footing I have doesn't bunch up, so it simply digs deeper.

Footing needs two things to be the kind of quality I want my horses on- give, and grab. It needs to have enough give, or bounce, to it, to be able to reduce concussion, without being deep. It needs to have enough grab to it that the horses don't ever slip in it.

I would add some sand to your chips...but, that is just me!
__________________
"When someone shows you who they are- BELIEVE them" Maya Angelou

Yes, that IS a windmill I am tilting at!

www.americansaddlebredsporthorse.net

http://www.asbsporthorse.blogspot.com/
  #10  
Old 06-19-2011, 09:11 AM
NBChoice
 
Posts: n/a
Well we don't have any problems at all with slipping or being too deep or anything. Actually, my horse moves the best I've seen him move since I've owned him on these woodchips.

Why would you suggest adding some sand? What does that do?
Sponsored Links
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:32 PM.


Links
Trot Homepage
Extendedtrot.com
ASHA
UPHA
USEF

Advertisers

Trotters on Facebook


 
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1997-2009 Trot.org, Equine Media, LLC
Ad Management by RedTyger